Blog Mantra and Music Videos

Dance of Dawn by Uña Ramos – a Traditional Andean Song

Dance of Dawn (Danza del Amanecer in Spanish) is a beautiful instrumental song performed by Uña Ramos, a widely celebrated Andean musician and composer.1

This song is an example of traditional Andean music from the Inca culture, where, like in many cultures descended from the lost civilization of the sun, reverence for the spiritual sun is deeply rooted.

Evidence of a solar religion can be found in various Inca (and pre-Inca) myths and legends, in their symbols, and in the sacred sites they used such as Machu Picchu, or the ruins in the Urubamba Sacred Valley, both of which are aligned to the cycle of the sun.2 They referred to themselves as the “Children of the Sun” and considered themselves to literally be descendants of the sun,3 and were known to have been taught by the wisdom bringer Virococha.4

This heritage is still reflected in traditional Andean/Inca songs today, many of which have themes and song names that celebrate the sun in some way, such as the one posted below.

More examples of Andean music can be found on the traditional and folk music resources page:

Traditional Music


Featured image is a screenshot from the video above.


  1. “Uña Ramos.” Wikipedia. November 07, 2017. Accessed December 08, 2017. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/U%C3%B1a_Ramos.  

  2. Belsebuub and Lara Atwood, The Path of the Spiritual Sun: Celebrating the Solstices and Equinoxes (Mystical Life Publications, revised second edition, July 2017), p. 302-304  

  3. Belsebuub and Lara Atwood, The Path of the Spiritual Sun p. 13  

  4. Belsebuub and Lara Atwood, The Path of the Spiritual Sun p. 251  

About the author

Vida Narovski

Vida Narovski a writer and researcher for SpiritualSun.com and is a practitioner of the Religion of the Sun. Vida is of Baltic descent, and she is fascinated by the remnants of the Religion of the Sun that are found in her Lithuanian roots, many of which are still prevalent in Lithuanian culture today. She explores ancient sacred sites and pores over ancient texts, with the hope of bringing back the relevance of the Religion of the Sun to those interested in spirituality today.

14 Comments

  • Great song, thanks for sharing Vida.

    I love Andean music, but I hadn’t heard this particular number until it was featured on the site. It’s a great example of the genre. Like others have mentioned, I also find it to be such spiritually uplifting, upbeat, melodic and joyous music.

  • Very nice, it creates a simple and joyful atmosphere.

    I always find it interesting what images these songs evoke. I often think of Machu Picchu, or similar grassy and forest like scenes in mountain ranges, and dancing and children running about. A very different sort of life, environment and time with no worries (or at least different ones.)

  • Thanks for highlighting this song, Vida. Una is the first Andean musician with whose songs I really felt a connection, especially his song of dedication to his father (that one doesn’t have a spiritual theme per se, but it really made me appreciate the feeling and depth that this kind of music can convey). Listening to Andean flutes and pan pipes outdoors under the stars can be very beautiful.

  • Very nice I have always been very fond of the Andean music, it does tend to make me smile I find it very happy music : ), Thanks Vida

  • I agree this is a great song. So many of Una Ramos’ songs have such a beautiful sense of melody, and this one is very fine.

    When I listen to Andean music I am sometimes reminded of the description of it in the book The Flight of the Feathered Serpent by Armando Cosani, in which it describes how Andean music contains insights about the celestial bodies and the heavens in its rhythm and melody.

    I can’t say I understand that concept very well, but there is something about the shape of the melody here, the instrumentation, the change in tempo, the rhythms, etc. that seem to convey that grandeur of nature and the cosmos. There are other traditional music forms that sometimes affect me in a similar way.

  • Thanks for drawing our attention to this Vida; it’s one of my favourite Una Ramos songs! I think it’s a good example of how he often managed to capture a simple and genuine sense of joy through his music.

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