Naturtuche – Historically Authentic Fabric and Yarn (wool, linen, silk)

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This topic contains 4 replies, has 2 voices, and was last updated by  Vida Norris 2 weeks, 5 days ago.

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  • #21608

    Laura
    Participant

    Hi,

    I happened to come across this online German fabric shop called Naturtuche. From the shop description, they sell ‘high quality historically authentic fabrics and yarn. Our customers are mainly LARP and reenactment enthusiasts but also a variety of theatres and playhouses.’

    I suppose then that their fabrics are better suited for historical clothing than those found in modern fabric shops. I was trying to find good woolen fabrics recently but there was hardly any to be found, and even when I did find some, they were too modern, stretchy and lightweight – more for office wear.

    Their wool selection especially seems extensive and the colours are nice. Their ratings seem good. Their prices are a little on the expensive side, but not more than in most other shops I’ve seen.

    I couldn’t really find how and where their fabrics are produced though, or whether they are particularly ecological. I’ve sent them an email about it and will report here when/if they reply.

    #21646

    Lucia
    Participant

    Looks like a nice shop Laura, thanks for sharing. As you said, it is hard to find good resources for traditional woolen fabrics today. It is great that they send the fabric samples too, as it is often very difficult to estimate what the fabric will look like in reality.

    #21653

    Laura
    Participant

    Perhaps I was too hasty (and excited from finding it) to post it here.. They came back to me saying most of their fabrics are sourced from China and are not organic quality.

    They did link me to another German fabric shop Lebens Kleidung who sells organic fabrics – however most of them seem too modern, light and stretchy for the type of clothes we want to make here. They have a small wool selection but it’s a little pricey. Their linen and silk is only for business accounts.

    @lucia, yes the samples help a lot. Though even with samples it’s sometimes difficult to estimate what the actual fabric will be like : o

    #21657

    Lucia
    Participant

    Hmmm, I would be interested in knowing more about these Chinese fabrics. Why would all of them be “bad”? Maybe if they told you exactly where they are made and in what way, it could be fine. Also I am not sure about the “organic” stuff, as sometimes things may be organic even though not labelled as such. I mean, maybe we should just learn more about it? Or maybe its just me who is not informed enough… :-O

    #21680

    Laura
    Participant

    Yes I’m sure not all of them can be so bad. It’s just that someone I know has lots of experience of China and from them I’ve understood it’s better to choose another option if possible. I’ve also heard a lot about how many companies and producers there don’t respect people or the environment and would sacrifice them for profit. But it’s probably better not to make a blanket judgment like mine above of course. And I totally agree with you about ‘organic’ things sometimes not being organic at all. It’s probably best as you said to enquire into the manufacturing or sourcing process of the individual producer or company or whatever it is as far as possible. I haven’t tried this so I’m not sure how willing companies would be to talk about it but if it’s a reliable one with nothing to hide then they should be willing I guess.

    #21756

    Ella
    Participant

    In general I’d be pretty put off things made in China, just as I’ve heard lots of horror stories about working conditions there. Part of the reason to wear these natural fabrics is because of their different ‘vibration’, and it spoils it for me thinking it might be made by people in degrading conditions. Saying that, often it’s a toss-up between wearing natural fabrics made in China, and then plastic-derived fabrics made elsewhere … and then I’d go for the natural fabrics. We live in a sad world, sadly, and can only do our best not to support harmful practise, it seems not total extract ourselves from it (at least, we can within our actions, but not in the products that we consume!)

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