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Ancient Sun Temple Revealed in North West China

Excavations of a mysterious ancient site in China’s North West Xinjiang region have revealed it to be a sun temple or altar.

Originally discovered in 1993, the site’s significance was unknown until recently, as archeologists only began excavating it last year.

The sun temple is made up of three rings of stone, reaching over 300 feet wide in diameter. Archaeologists believe the site was used by people who venerated the sun.1

Cosmic microwave symbol of the absolute

The three concentric rings discovered in the cosmic microwave background of the universe. Image credit: this work has been recreated for The Path of the Spiritual Sun based on the research by Roger Penrose and Vahe Gurzadayan, 2010. Background is a public domain image from NASA / WMAP Science Team. More information about the study here.

This formation resembles a symbol found to be associated with the mantra Om and discovered by scientists to be present in the “cosmic microwave background” of the universe — this symbol has been explained as representing the source of creation we all come from and can ultimately return to by seeking enlightenment.2

Interestingly, Xinjiang is the same region where China’s red-haired Tarim mummies were found. These mummies come from a group of people known as the Tocharians, an Indo-European tribe who once inhabited the area who appear to have practiced the ancient religion of the sun.


  1. Full article on National Geographic http://news.nationalgeographic.com/2017/06/xinjiang-sun-altar-ancient-china-archaeology-spd/  

  2. Belsebuub and Lara Atwood. The Path of the Spiritual Sun: The Spiritual Meaning of the Summer Solstice. Mystical Life Publications, 2016. Chapter 10, p. 282 – 284 

About the author

Vida Narovski

Vida Narovski a writer and researcher for SpiritualSun.com and is a practitioner of the Religion of the Sun. Vida is of Baltic descent, and she is fascinated by the remnants of the Religion of the Sun that are found in her Lithuanian roots, many of which are still prevalent in Lithuanian culture today. She explores ancient sacred sites and pores over ancient texts, with the hope of bringing back the relevance of the Religion of the Sun to those interested in spirituality today.

5 Comments

  • This is pretty cool. Reminds me of a sun temple mound I recently came across in Asia Minor. Going to dig it up so I can post about it 🙂

  • I just want to say this site looks very cool. The design is awesome! It looks like it incorporates the sun cross as well as the rings (it’s almost like the logo in the banner of this website).

    I know it’s a lot of work, but having a mound as part of a sacred site just adds an extra special touch I think – imagine being raised above the surrounding landscape and seeing sunrises/sunsets – the view would be just that better. And there’s also something special about walking up to a sacred space.

    Has anyone been to any mounds that incorporate alignments to the solstices or equinoxes? If so, what did they feel like?

    • Yes I agree, having a raised mound makes all the difference for a much clearer and impressive view of the horizon.

      I have been to Cairnpapple Hill near Edinburgh, Scotland a few times, which is on a man-made mound and aligned to the Equinoxes as well as other sites that if on a clear day you may be able to see the Sun rising/setting from a place called Arthur’s Seat (seen at a distance that would take almost an hour to drive to.)

      I have also been to the Glastonbury Tor, which I believe the alignment here can be observed from another hill nearby.

      The 360 views have been very impressive, and I have always appreciated a special stillness and peacefulness at these places that feel significant and calming. Its always hard for me to leave Glastonbury Tor in particular, its a place you can just stay at all day, and chime in to the feeling of the place.

  • A very interesting looking site. I’m sure it would be amazing to see the sunrise there. I wonder if the indentation in the very middle was used as a place for a bonfire which would be lit as the sun rose.

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